Why i want to be a writer essay

The Excellent Why I Want to Be a Nurse Essay Admission Paper Example

If you want to be admitted to nursing school, you will have to write a why I want to be a nurse essay. This academic paper will have to convince the admissions committee that you are a good fit for their school. This is more difficult than it sounds because there are so many applicants who are competing with you for a spot at the nursing school. Your why do I want to be a nurse essay must impress your evaluators and make them realize that you have the potential to become a great nurse. This is why you will be happy to hear that we are providing a free why I want to be a nurse essay sample. You can use it as a starting point for free.

Why I Want to Be a Nurse

Usually, when we look up the word “nurse” in a dictionary, we find out that it is somebody who cares for a sick person. It sounds so simple and so impersonal. However, I believe being a nurse is much more than just taking care of the needs of a sick person. As one wise man once said, “nursing is a profession where the need to understand your patient outweighs your need to be understood.” Nurses, both male and female, offer invaluable support to people who may be in great pain, who may have suffered life changing injuries, or who may be dying. This is why it is my belief that a nurse has to be not only perseverant, but also determined, strong-willed, and very thoughtful of others’ sufferings.

So, why do I want to become a nurse? Every day I see people begging for a few pennies on the street so that they can help their loved ones. They are desperate to help people who cannot help themselves. This makes me feel so helpless. I want to be able to do more than just give a few pennies to these people. I want to be able to help them directly. To be honest, I have always felt the need to care for people who cannot take care of themselves. It is in my nature. This is why I know that nursing is what I want to do for the rest of my life.

It is not about money; nurses are not paid handsomely, as you already may know. To me, nursing is truly the right profession. I sincerely believe that I am more than suited to become a nurse. My qualities all point in this direction. I am warm and very compassionate. I have great communication skills and I am a quick learner. Also, I am empathetic and diplomatic; I understand that I will need to communicate with the family and friends of the person I am caring for. This is sometimes not easy to do, and one needs a specific set of skills to be able to put their mind at ease.

The nursing profession is ever-changing and diverse. You never know who you will be caring for tomorrow. Every person is different and each one of us reacts differently to certain situations. However, I am confident that I can successfully handle any situation the nursing profession may throw at me. At the end of the day, the well-being of the person I am caring for is what matters, and I will do whatever is in my power to help a complete stranger in need of assistance. I know that this is the path I choose and I will always be proud of the work I will do every day as a nurse. All I need is the chance to get the excellent education required to become an excellent nurse.

Reasons Writers Write

The spoken word passes away; the written word abides

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Golden desk lamp, open books, old-fashioned typewriter and writer's equipment on wooden desk, high angle view.

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  • English Grammar
    • An Introduction to Punctuation
    • Ph.D., Rhetoric and English, University of Georgia
    • M.A., Modern English and American Literature, University of Leicester
    • B.A., English, State University of New York

    Dr. Richard Nordquist is professor emeritus of rhetoric and English at Georgia Southern University and the author of several university-level grammar and composition textbooks.

    In his Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D. (1791), James Boswell reports that Johnson “uniformly held to that strange opinion, which his indolent disposition made him utter: ‘No man but a blockhead ever wrote except for money.'”

    Then Boswell adds, “Numerous instances to refute this will occur to all who are versed in the history of literature.”

    Perhaps because writing isn’t a particularly lucrative profession (especially for beginners), most writers side with Boswell on this issue.

    Writers on Writing

    But if it’s not money, what does motivate writers to write? Consider how 12 professional writers responded to this question.

    1. “The question we writers are asked most often, the favorite question, is: Why do you write? I write because I have an innate need to write. I write because I can’t do normal work as other people do. I write because I want to read books like the ones I write. I write because I am angry at everyone. I write because I love sitting in a room all day writing. I write because I can partake of real life only by changing it. . . .”
      (Orhan Pamuk, “My Father’s Suitcase” [Nobel Prize acceptance speech, December 2006]. Other Colors: Essays and a Story, translated from the Turkish by Maureen Freely. Vintage Canada, 2008)
    2. “I write because I want to find something out. I write in order to learn something that I didn’t know before I wrote it.”
      (Laurel Richardson, Fields of Play: Constructing an Academic Life. Rutgers University Press, 1997)
    3. “I write because I enjoy expressing myself, and writing forces me to think more coherently than I do when just shooting off my mouth.”
      (William Safire, William Safire on Language. Times Books, 1980)
    4. I write because it’s the only thing I’m really very good at in the whole world. And I’ve got to stay busy to stay out of trouble, to keep from going crazy, dying of depression. So I continue to do the one thing in the world that I feel very very good at. I get an enormous amount of pleasure out of it.”
      (Reynolds Price, quoted by S.D. Williams in “Reynolds Price on the South, Literature, and Himself.” Conversations With Reynolds Price, ed. by Jefferson Humphries. University Press of Mississippi, 1991)
    5. One writes to make a home for oneself, on paper, in time, in others’ minds.”
      (Alfred Kazin, “The Self As History.” Telling Lives, ed. by Marc Pachter. New Republic Books, 1979)
    6. Why do I write? It’s not that I want people to think I am smart, or even that I am a good writer. I write because I want to end my loneliness. Books make people less alone. That, before and after everything else, is what books do. They show us that conversations are possible across distances.”
      (Jonathan Safran Foer, quoted by Deborah Solomon in “The Rescue Artist.” The New York Times, February 27, 2005)
    7. I write basically because it’s so much fun — even though I can’t see. When I’m not writing, as my wife knows, I’m miserable.”
      (James Thurber, interviewed by George Plimpton and Max Steele, 1955. The Paris Review Interviews, Vol. II, ed. by Philip Gourevitch. Picador, 2007)
    8. Nothing ever seems to me quite real at the moment it happens. It’s part of the reason for writing, since the experience never seems quite real until I evoke it again. That’s all one tries to do in writing, really, to hold something—the past, the present.”
      (Gore Vidal, interviewed by Bob Stanton in Views from a Window: Conversations With Gore Vidal. Lyle Stuart, 1980)
    9. We do not write because we must; we always have choice. We write because language is the way we keep a hold on life.”
      (bell hooks [Gloria Watkins], Remembered Rapture: The Writer at Work. Henry Holt and Co., 1999)
    10. [Y]ou get a great deal off your chest — emotions, impressions, opinions. Curiosity urges you on — the driving force. What is collected must be got rid of.”
      (John Dos Passos. The Paris Review Interviews, Vol. IV, ed. by George Plimpton. Viking, 1976)
    11. It is the deepest desire of every writer, the one we never admit or even dare to speak of: to write a book we can leave as a legacy. . . . If you do it right, and if they publish it, you may actually leave something behind that can last forever.”
      (Alice Hoffman, “The Book That Wouldn’t Die: A Writer’s Last and Longest Voyage.” The New York Times, July 22, 1990)
    12. I write to make peace with the things I cannot control. I write to create red in a world that often appears black and white. I write to discover. I write to uncover. I write to meet my ghosts. I write to begin a dialogue. I write to imagine things differently and in imagining things differently perhaps the world will change. I write to honor beauty. I write to correspond with my friends. I write as a daily act of improvisation. I write because it creates my composure. I write against power and for democracy. I write myself out of my nightmares and into my dreams. . . .”
      (Terry Tempest Williams, “A Letter to Deb Clow.” Red: Passion and Patience in the Desert. Pantheon Books, 2001)

    Now it’s your turn. Regardless of what you write — fiction or nonfiction, poetry or prose, letters, or journal entries — see if you can explain why you write.

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    Once you’ve passed the previous steps, you’ll be hired for a 1 month trial period. After this time, if you’ve performed well, you will officially join the writing team!

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    First, you’ll provide documentation to verify your identity. This information allows us to provide your payment and helps keep our platform safe for our customers.

    Diploma Verification

    Next you’ll provide diplomas or other documents, to prove you’ve completed higher education within the past 5 years. These documents must include stamps and signatures from your college or university.

    Provide Writing Samples

    Once we’ve verified your education documents, we’ll ask you to provide writing samples for our QA department to review. Please note, applicants must have at least 1 year of experience.

    Test Assignment

    After an interview, you’ll write a 1 page paper on a randomly selected topic. This will demonstrate you have the necessary talent and experience to join our team.

    Trial Period

    Once you’ve passed the previous steps, you’ll be hired for a 1 month trial period. After this time, if you’ve performed well, you will officially join the writing team!

    Why I Write

    From a very early age, perhaps the age of five or six, I knew that when I grew up I should be a writer. Between the ages of about seventeen and twenty-four I tried to abandon this idea, but I did so with the consciousness that I was outraging my true nature and that sooner or later I should have to settle down and write books.

    I was the middle child of three, but there was a gap of five years on either side, and I barely saw my father before I was eight. For this and other reasons I was somewhat lonely, and I soon developed disagreeable mannerisms which made me unpopular throughout my schooldays. I had the lonely child’s habit of making up stories and holding conversations with imaginary persons, and I think from the very start my literary ambitions were mixed up with the feeling of being isolated and undervalued. I knew that I had a facility with words and a power of facing unpleasant facts, and I felt that this created a sort of private world in which I could get my own back for my failure in everyday life. Nevertheless the volume of serious – i.e. seriously intended ­– writing which I produced all through my childhood and boyhood would not amount to half a dozen pages. I wrote my first poem at the age of four or five, my mother taking it down to dictation. I cannot remember anything about it except that it was about a tiger and the tiger had ‘chair-like teeth’ – a good enough phrase, but I fancy the poem was a plagiarism of Blake’s ‘Tiger, Tiger’. At eleven, when the war or 1914-18 broke out, I wrote a patriotic poem which was printed in the local newspaper, as was another, two years later, on the death of Kitchener. From time to time, when I was a bit older, I wrote bad and usually unfinished ‘nature poems’ in the Georgian style. I also, about twice, attempted a short story which was a ghastly failure. That was the total of the would-be serious work that I actually set down on paper during all those years.

    However, throughout this time I did in a sense engage in literary activities. To begin with there was the made-to-order stuff which I produced quickly, easily and without much pleasure to myself. Apart from school work, I wrote vers d’occasion, semi-comic poems which I could turn out at what now seems to me astonishing speed – at fourteen I wrote a whole rhyming play, in imitation of Aristophanes, in about a week – and helped to edit school magazines, both printed and in manuscript. These magazines were the most pitiful burlesque stuff that you could imagine, and I took far less trouble with them than I now would with the cheapest journalism. But side by side with all this, for fifteen years or more, I was carrying out a literary exercise of a quite different kind: this was the making up of a continuous “story” about myself, a sort of diary existing only in the mind. I believe this is a common habit of children and adolescents. As a very small child I used to imagine that I was, say, Robin Hood, and picture myself as the hero of thrilling adventures, but quite soon my “story” ceased to be narcissistic in a crude way and became more and more a mere description of what I was doing and the things I saw. For minutes at a time this kind of thing would be running through my head: ‘He pushed the door open and entered the room. A yellow beam of sunlight, filtering through the muslin curtains, slanted on to the table, where a matchbox, half-open, lay beside the inkpot. With his right hand in his pocket he moved across to the window. Down in the street a tortoiseshell cat was chasing a dead leaf,’ etc., etc. This habit continued until I was about twenty-five, right through my non-literary years. Although I had to search, and did search, for the right words, I seemed to be making this descriptive effort almost against my will, under a kind of compulsion from outside. The ‘story’ must, I suppose, have reflected the styles of the various writers I admired at different ages, but so far as I remember it always had the same meticulous descriptive quality.

    When I was about sixteen I suddenly discovered the joy of mere words, i.e. the sounds and associations of words. The lines from Paradise Lost

    So hee with difficulty and labour hard
    Moved on: with difficulty and labour hee,

    which do not now seem to me so very wonderful, sent shivers down my backbone; and the spelling ‘hee’ for ‘he’ was an added pleasure. As for the need to describe things, I knew all about it already. So it is clear what kind of books I wanted to write, in so far as I could be said to want to write books at that time. I wanted to write enormous naturalistic novels with unhappy endings, full of detailed descriptions and arresting similes, and also full of purple passages in which words were used partly for the sake of their sound. And in fact my first completed novel, Burmese Days, which I wrote when I was thirty but projected much earlier, is rather that kind of book.

    I give all this background information because I do not think one can assess a writer’s motives without knowing something of his early development. His subject-matter will be determined by the age he lives in ­– at least this is true in tumultuous, revolutionary ages like our own – but before he ever begins to write he will have acquired an emotional attitude from which he will never completely escape. It is his job, no doubt, to discipline his temperament and avoid getting stuck at some immature stage, or in some perverse mood: but if he escapes from his early influences altogether, he will have killed his impulse to write. Putting aside the need to earn a living, I think there are four great motives for writing, at any rate for writing prose. They exist in different degrees in every writer, and in any one writer the proportions will vary from time to time, according to the atmosphere in which he is living. They are:

    (i) Sheer egoism. Desire to seem clever, to be talked about, to be remembered after death, to get your own back on grown-ups who snubbed you in childhood, etc., etc. It is humbug to pretend this is not a motive, and a strong one. Writers share this characteristic with scientists, artists, politicians, lawyers, soldiers, successful business men – in short, with the whole top crust of humanity. The great mass of human beings are not acutely selfish. After the age of about thirty they abandon individual ambition – in many cases, indeed, they almost abandon the sense of being individuals at all – and live chiefly for others, or are simply smothered under drudgery. But there is also the minority of gifted, willful people who are determined to live their own lives to the end, and writers belong in this class. Serious writers, I should say, are on the whole more vain and self-centered than journalists, though less interested in money.

    (ii) Aesthetic enthusiasm. Perception of beauty in the external world, or, on the other hand, in words and their right arrangement. Pleasure in the impact of one sound on another, in the firmness of good prose or the rhythm of a good story. Desire to share an experience which one feels is valuable and ought not to be missed. The aesthetic motive is very feeble in a lot of writers, but even a pamphleteer or writer of textbooks will have pet words and phrases which appeal to him for non-utilitarian reasons; or he may feel strongly about typography, width of margins, etc. Above the level of a railway guide, no book is quite free from aesthetic considerations.

    (iii) Historical impulse. Desire to see things as they are, to find out true facts and store them up for the use of posterity.

    (iv) Political purpose – using the word ‘political’ in the widest possible sense. Desire to push the world in a certain direction, to alter other people’s idea of the kind of society that they should strive after. Once again, no book is genuinely free from political bias. The opinion that art should have nothing to do with politics is itself a political attitude.

    It can be seen how these various impulses must war against one another, and how they must fluctuate from person to person and from time to time. By nature – taking your ‘nature’ to be the state you have attained when you are first adult – I am a person in whom the first three motives would outweigh the fourth. In a peaceful age I might have written ornate or merely descriptive books, and might have remained almost unaware of my political loyalties. As it is I have been forced into becoming a sort of pamphleteer. First I spent five years in an unsuitable profession (the Indian Imperial Police, in Burma), and then I underwent poverty and the sense of failure. This increased my natural hatred of authority and made me for the first time fully aware of the existence of the working classes, and the job in Burma had given me some understanding of the nature of imperialism: but these experiences were not enough to give me an accurate political orientation. Then came Hitler, the Spanish Civil War, etc. By the end of 1935 I had still failed to reach a firm decision. I remember a little poem that I wrote at that date, expressing my dilemma:

    A happy vicar I might have been
    Two hundred years ago,
    To preach upon eternal doom
    And watch my walnuts grow

    But born, alas, in an evil time,
    I missed that pleasant haven,
    For the hair has grown on my upper lip
    And the clergy are all clean-shaven.

    And later still the times were good,
    We were so easy to please,
    We rocked our troubled thoughts to sleep
    On the bosoms of the trees.

    All ignorant we dared to own
    The joys we now dissemble;
    The greenfinch on the apple bough
    Could make my enemies tremble.

    But girls’ bellies and apricots,
    Roach in a shaded stream,
    Horses, ducks in flight at dawn,
    All these are a dream.

    It is forbidden to dream again;
    We maim our joys or hide them;
    Horses are made of chromium steel
    And little fat men shall ride them.

    I am the worm who never turned,
    The eunuch without a harem;
    Between the priest and the commissar
    I walk like Eugene Aram;

    And the commissar is telling my fortune
    While the radio plays,
    But the priest has promised an Austin Seven,
    For Duggie always pays.

    I dreamt I dwelt in marble halls,
    And woke to find it true;
    I wasn’t born for an age like this;
    Was Smith? Was Jones? Were you?

    The Spanish war and other events in 1936-37 turned the scale and thereafter I knew where I stood. Every line of serious work that I have written since 1936 has been written, directly or indirectly, against totalitarianism and for democratic socialism, as I understand it. It seems to me nonsense, in a period like our own, to think that one can avoid writing of such subjects. Everyone writes of them in one guise or another. It is simply a question of which side one takes and what approach one follows. And the more one is conscious of one’s political bias, the more chance one has of acting politically without sacrificing one’s aesthetic and intellectual integrity.

    What I have most wanted to do throughout the past ten years is to make political writing into an art. My starting point is always a feeling of partisanship, a sense of injustice. When I sit down to write a book, I do not say to myself, ‘I am going to produce a work of art’. I write it because there is some lie that I want to expose, some fact to which I want to draw attention, and my initial concern is to get a hearing. But I could not do the work of writing a book, or even a long magazine article, if it were not also an aesthetic experience. Anyone who cares to examine my work will see that even when it is downright propaganda it contains much that a full-time politician would consider irrelevant. I am not able, and do not want, completely to abandon the world view that I acquired in childhood. So long as I remain alive and well I shall continue to feel strongly about prose style, to love the surface of the earth, and to take a pleasure in solid objects and scraps of useless information. It is no use trying to suppress that side of myself. The job is to reconcile my ingrained likes and dislikes with the essentially public, non-individual activities that this age forces on all of us.

    It is not easy. It raises problems of construction and of language, and it raises in a new way the problem of truthfulness. Let me give just one example of the cruder kind of difficulty that arises. My book about the Spanish civil war, Homage to Catalonia, is of course a frankly political book, but in the main it is written with a certain detachment and regard for form. I did try very hard in it to tell the whole truth without violating my literary instincts. But among other things it contains a long chapter, full of newspaper quotations and the like, defending the Trotskyists who were accused of plotting with Franco. Clearly such a chapter, which after a year or two would lose its interest for any ordinary reader, must ruin the book. A critic whom I respect read me a lecture about it. ‘Why did you put in all that stuff?’ he said. ‘You’ve turned what might have been a good book into journalism.’ What he said was true, but I could not have done otherwise. I happened to know, what very few people in England had been allowed to know, that innocent men were being falsely accused. If I had not been angry about that I should never have written the book.

    In one form or another this problem comes up again. The problem of language is subtler and would take too long to discuss. I will only say that of late years I have tried to write less picturesquely and more exactly. In any case I find that by the time you have perfected any style of writing, you have always outgrown it. Animal Farm was the first book in which I tried, with full consciousness of what I was doing, to fuse political purpose and artistic purpose into one whole. I have not written a novel for seven years, but I hope to write another fairly soon. It is bound to be a failure, every book is a failure, but I do know with some clarity what kind of book I want to write.

    Looking back through the last page or two, I see that I have made it appear as though my motives in writing were wholly public-spirited. I don’t want to leave that as the final impression. All writers are vain, selfish, and lazy, and at the very bottom of their motives there lies a mystery. Writing a book is a horrible, exhausting struggle, like a long bout of some painful illness. One would never undertake such a thing if one were not driven on by some demon whom one can neither resist or understand. For all one knows that demon is simply the same instinct that makes a baby squall for attention. And yet it is also true that one can write nothing readable unless one constantly struggles to efface one’s own personality. Good prose is like a windowpane. I cannot say with certainty which of my motives are the strongest, but I know which of them deserve to be followed. And looking back through my work, I see that it is invariably where I lacked a political purpose that I wrote lifeless books and was betrayed into purple passages, sentences without meaning, decorative adjectives and humbug generally.

    11 reasons why essay writing is important in one’s professional life

    essay witing

    Every student has to write essays at school or college. It is the most widespread type of homework. Why do tutors like this type of assignment? Well, there are a lot of reasons. Essay writing helps to evaluate a student’s research, analytical, and persuasive skills, which are essential in a grown life. Keep on reading the post if you want to take a deep dive and find an answer to the question – “why are strong writing skills important?”

    Improves writing skills

    For starters, it helps to improve your paper writing skills. Do not hesitate to practice as much as possible to become the best writer and create top-grade essays with ease. It will help you to increase your college score and learn how to create engaging and well-thought-out papers with no effort.

    Helps to demonstrate yourintelligence

    It’s easy to distinguish a well-educated person from the first sentences of his paper. If you want to look professional and gain your credibility, perfect essay writing skills is the must. Learn how to write top-notch essays to showcase yourself as a skilled professional in future life.

    Gains research skills

    It’s impossible to create an A+ paper without thorough research. Nowadays, in the digital era, research skills are essential. There are tons of information available on the Internet. Just grab your smartphone, ask a question, and find an answer simultaneously. However, not all the posts and articles on the WEB are correct. Essay writing will teach you how to find trustworthy information, analyze, and double-check it.

    Increase your knowledge in different niches

    Conducting research, we always learn something new. Writing essays on different topics, students explore a lot of resources and gather a lot of information. Therefore students learn something new that is not related to their major.

    Helps to find a job

    Do you want to find a good and well-paying job after graduation? If so, do not hesitate to practice in essay writing. Everybody knows that you have to submit a resume and a cover letter applying for a job. A well-made CV will showcase you as a skilled and well-educated person.

    Also, a professional cover letter can engage a hire manager and tell more about your advantages and professional skills.

    Writing skills are required for promotion

    Do you want to work in one position the entire life? I guess that the answer is no. If you’re going to get a promotion, you have to indicate yourself as a well-educated person.

    Imagine a situation when you need to write an email to your boss, create an annual report or presentation. If your email, documents, or a slideshow contains every-day language, misspelling, or grammar errors, you will hardly get a promotion.

    Therefore, always double-check your essays by using online tools for writers and proofread them thoroughly. If all your messages and papers have the top-grade quality, you will be a great candidate for a promotion.

    Improves critical-thinking skills

    Why is writing important in life? Well, essay writing is not only a hair-pulling thing when you have to explore a lot of different resources and write your thoughts down. Creating a college paper, you have to analyze and evaluate the gathered information. You should take a deep dive into a topic, collect information, and cross the wrong things out.

    Teaches how to deliver ideas

    Students should supplement papers with their viewpoints. If you want to learn how to form and deliver your personal opinion, essay writing is one of the best practices to learn how to share your opinion.

    Also, essay writing will help you to learn how to engage a reader, use transitions words, and create an uninterrupted flow of facts and ideas.

    Gains persuasive skills

    People may reject your ideas even if they are great. To improve students’ convincing skills, tutors often assign persuasive essays. This type of academic writing requires students to convince a reader by using solid facts and statements.

    Sometimes learners experience any problems writing essays and need paper help. In this case, they reach online assignment creation platforms to get top-grade college papers from expert writers.

    Helps to create engaging articles and posts

    Do you want your posts to attract a lot of readers? Learn how to create engaging papers by writing college essays. Writing college papers, you can learn how to create hooks that drive readers to explore a blog post, use statistics, and citations to capture the attention of readers.

    Improves communication skills

    People are social creatures. It means that we live in communities from ancient times. If you want to become successful in society, you should have excellent communication skills. One of the great ways to boost them is to write essays. Academic writing requires students to share their thoughts and communicate with readers by using words only.

    Final words about essay writing

    Answering the question – “what are good writing skills?” I can indicate the following. Excellent essay writing skills are a combination of research, critical thinking, persuasive, and correct writing skills.

    In short, you have to take a deep dive into a chosen topic, analyze it, share your thought, and supplement them with solid facts. Also, don’t forget that you should deliver a paper that contains zero spelling and grammar errors if you want to get A+ for your essay.

    Reasons Writers Write

    The spoken word passes away; the written word abides

    • Share
    • Flipboard
    • Email

    Golden desk lamp, open books, old-fashioned typewriter and writer's equipment on wooden desk, high angle view.

    Stephen Oliver/Getty Images

    • English Grammar
      • An Introduction to Punctuation
      • Ph.D., Rhetoric and English, University of Georgia
      • M.A., Modern English and American Literature, University of Leicester
      • B.A., English, State University of New York

      Dr. Richard Nordquist is professor emeritus of rhetoric and English at Georgia Southern University and the author of several university-level grammar and composition textbooks.

      In his Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D. (1791), James Boswell reports that Johnson “uniformly held to that strange opinion, which his indolent disposition made him utter: ‘No man but a blockhead ever wrote except for money.'”

      Then Boswell adds, “Numerous instances to refute this will occur to all who are versed in the history of literature.”

      Perhaps because writing isn’t a particularly lucrative profession (especially for beginners), most writers side with Boswell on this issue.

      Writers on Writing

      But if it’s not money, what does motivate writers to write? Consider how 12 professional writers responded to this question.

      1. “The question we writers are asked most often, the favorite question, is: Why do you write? I write because I have an innate need to write. I write because I can’t do normal work as other people do. I write because I want to read books like the ones I write. I write because I am angry at everyone. I write because I love sitting in a room all day writing. I write because I can partake of real life only by changing it. . . .”
        (Orhan Pamuk, “My Father’s Suitcase” [Nobel Prize acceptance speech, December 2006]. Other Colors: Essays and a Story, translated from the Turkish by Maureen Freely. Vintage Canada, 2008)
      2. “I write because I want to find something out. I write in order to learn something that I didn’t know before I wrote it.”
        (Laurel Richardson, Fields of Play: Constructing an Academic Life. Rutgers University Press, 1997)
      3. “I write because I enjoy expressing myself, and writing forces me to think more coherently than I do when just shooting off my mouth.”
        (William Safire, William Safire on Language. Times Books, 1980)
      4. I write because it’s the only thing I’m really very good at in the whole world. And I’ve got to stay busy to stay out of trouble, to keep from going crazy, dying of depression. So I continue to do the one thing in the world that I feel very very good at. I get an enormous amount of pleasure out of it.”
        (Reynolds Price, quoted by S.D. Williams in “Reynolds Price on the South, Literature, and Himself.” Conversations With Reynolds Price, ed. by Jefferson Humphries. University Press of Mississippi, 1991)
      5. One writes to make a home for oneself, on paper, in time, in others’ minds.”
        (Alfred Kazin, “The Self As History.” Telling Lives, ed. by Marc Pachter. New Republic Books, 1979)
      6. Why do I write? It’s not that I want people to think I am smart, or even that I am a good writer. I write because I want to end my loneliness. Books make people less alone. That, before and after everything else, is what books do. They show us that conversations are possible across distances.”
        (Jonathan Safran Foer, quoted by Deborah Solomon in “The Rescue Artist.” The New York Times, February 27, 2005)
      7. I write basically because it’s so much fun — even though I can’t see. When I’m not writing, as my wife knows, I’m miserable.”
        (James Thurber, interviewed by George Plimpton and Max Steele, 1955. The Paris Review Interviews, Vol. II, ed. by Philip Gourevitch. Picador, 2007)
      8. Nothing ever seems to me quite real at the moment it happens. It’s part of the reason for writing, since the experience never seems quite real until I evoke it again. That’s all one tries to do in writing, really, to hold something—the past, the present.”
        (Gore Vidal, interviewed by Bob Stanton in Views from a Window: Conversations With Gore Vidal. Lyle Stuart, 1980)
      9. We do not write because we must; we always have choice. We write because language is the way we keep a hold on life.”
        (bell hooks [Gloria Watkins], Remembered Rapture: The Writer at Work. Henry Holt and Co., 1999)
      10. [Y]ou get a great deal off your chest — emotions, impressions, opinions. Curiosity urges you on — the driving force. What is collected must be got rid of.”
        (John Dos Passos. The Paris Review Interviews, Vol. IV, ed. by George Plimpton. Viking, 1976)
      11. It is the deepest desire of every writer, the one we never admit or even dare to speak of: to write a book we can leave as a legacy. . . . If you do it right, and if they publish it, you may actually leave something behind that can last forever.”
        (Alice Hoffman, “The Book That Wouldn’t Die: A Writer’s Last and Longest Voyage.” The New York Times, July 22, 1990)
      12. I write to make peace with the things I cannot control. I write to create red in a world that often appears black and white. I write to discover. I write to uncover. I write to meet my ghosts. I write to begin a dialogue. I write to imagine things differently and in imagining things differently perhaps the world will change. I write to honor beauty. I write to correspond with my friends. I write as a daily act of improvisation. I write because it creates my composure. I write against power and for democracy. I write myself out of my nightmares and into my dreams. . . .”
        (Terry Tempest Williams, “A Letter to Deb Clow.” Red: Passion and Patience in the Desert. Pantheon Books, 2001)

      Now it’s your turn. Regardless of what you write — fiction or nonfiction, poetry or prose, letters, or journal entries — see if you can explain why you write.

      Why I Want to Be a Teacher Essay: Writing Guide [2022]

      Some people know which profession to choose from childhood, while others decide much later in life. However, and whenever you come to it, you may have to elaborate on it in your personal statement or cover letter. This is widely known as “Why I Want to Be a Teacher” essay.

      We’ll write a unique paper tailored to your instructions.

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      The primary reasons to pursue this career are:

      If you’re having trouble coming up with arguments, you have come to the right place! Here, at Custom-Writing, we gathered all the essential tips to use in a “being a teacher” essays.

      🎓 7 Reasons to Become a Teacher

      Why do you want to be a teacher? Being one seems manageable if it’s your dream job. At the same time, it’s the hardest profession that wouldn’t fit everyone. Check the following reasons to become a teacher that you can use in your paper.

      Also, the following points are entirely appropriate for children. If they have a task like a “When I grow up, I want to become a teacher because…” essay, they will find this section useful.

      🌱 Raising New Generations

      Do you think that future generations require different teaching? Do you have an idea of a new proper approach? Whatever you believe, make sure to write about it:

      Place the order and get your paper in 3 hours, plagiarism-free!

      Would you like to see a more environmentally-conscious generation? Or do you find that kids lack concentration and the will to succeed? Explain why you consider children and teens need guidance.

      To support your argument, give statistics and real-life examples of the problems modern children and teens have. Provide the leading causes and solutions for this issue in your “Why I Want to Be a Teacher” essay.

      How did you understand that the problem above exists? You have to write why you thought about it in the first place.

      For example, siblings. Do you have a younger sibling? Or a nephew who often asks you to play with him or her? Then, in your “Why I Want to Be a Teacher” essay, you might mention that this child helped you choose a future career.

      What makes you think you might be a good teacher? Does the child enjoy spending time with you? Did you manage to teach the child something useful? Make sure to discuss this in your essay.

      Our specialists will write a custom essay
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      So, are you ready to write about raising new generations? Check this essay sample below to ensure your success:

      🎨 Creativity in Teaching

      In this kind of essay, you would shift the focus from yourself to the teacher’s profession in general. You’ll elaborate on why you find this profession a great creative outlet.

      Talk about creativity that you’ll bring to the classroom. Use this reasoning to explain why this profession is one of a kind and appropriate for you in particular. Do you think that you might use your creative abilities to become an excellent teacher?

      To underline your points:

      Share several ideas on how to educate children using innovative approaches. Kids are naturally compelling storytellers because of their sincerity and imagination. Maybe, you’ll find a way to use it.

      Only $13.00 $10.40/page , and you can get an originally-written academic paper according to your instructions

      🔍 Qualities of a Good Teacher

      All the educator’s responsibilities require communication and writing skills. They have to acquire accountability, patience, creativity, etc.

      You may be wondering: how can this topic help me explain why I want to become a teacher? The essay should compare the qualities of a good teacher with your own. Thus, you’ll show how good you are for the position.

      Do you believe that a good teacher should be kind? If positive, mention some example that proves your desire to help. For example, you might have volunteered at an animal shelter.

      Do you argue that a good teacher should be knowledgeable? Tell your readers about your good grades in college.

      Still, wondering about how to write a good paper on an educator’s qualities? Check the useful teacher essay sample, written by a student:

      🏫 Duties and Responsibilities

      While this topic may sound similar to the previous ones, it’s all about how you present your arguments and structure your narrative. This topic offers you an opportunity to examine the day-to-day lives of teachers.

      First of all, you can describe the duties and responsibilities of a teacher. Explore it, be it grading assignments, cooperating and communicating with parents, or continuously learning.

      Secondly, you can focus on the aspects of teaching that you find rewarding. You can add in your essay writing the sadness that a teacher feels when his or her students graduate. Or talk about the joy they experience when they see students learning and improving their grades.

      Whichever approach you choose, make sure it’s beneficial for you and reveals your strong sides.

      👩‍🏫 My Best Teacher

      This type of essay is similar to the previous ones. Here, you also describe the characteristics of an excellent teacher. There is, however, one key difference:

      Rather than describing some abstract figures, you would describe a real-life teacher. Talk about the person who served as a role model and inspired you to pursue this career.

      The premise of this essay is excellent:

      First, you show an understanding of what the job of a teacher encompasses. Second, you also demonstrate your appreciation for someone who made a difference in your life.

      “My best teacher” topic is an excellent opportunity to pay tribute to your teacher or a trainer who has significantly influenced your life.

      👨‍🎓 Skills and Qualifications

      You probably didn’t even realize that there are so many different ways to write a “Why I Want to Be a Teacher” essay.

      This type of paper emphasizes yet another aspect of the profession. Here, you’ll talk about the skills and qualifications necessary to become a teacher. To return to the purpose of the essay, demonstrate that you have them.

      Naturally, you will want to discuss the many different professional preparation programs out there. Apart from that, you may also want to check teacher training tips:

      Is the cashier taking too long to bag your groceries? Patience is a virtue that’s essential at school.

      But what is the meaning of a professional teacher? Can they be nonprofessional? Let’s take a closer look at what features an educator should obtain:

      Lack of preferences. Regardless of their level, an educator should not have any pet students or disclose anything that relates to student performance. It may seem to be easy, but some ethical issues arise. For example, can we say that students who get As should have some preferences? Should the teacher note students who got С on the last test? If so, wouldn’t it be unprofessional behavior?

      Sense of authority. Professional educators manage a class’s environment and establish their presence. They know when it’s time for informal conversation in class and when it’s inappropriate.

      Good content knowledge. Professional teachers always seek additional sources to boost their knowledge and skills. Teaching the lesson material should be addressed to each student. Real professionals can explain complicated math and physics in easy words.

      Communication skills. A professional teacher always has time to learn more about their students. They know what motivates and discourages pupils and update the curriculum accordingly. Educators can create a friendly environment in class.

      Comprehension of students’ needs. Professional teachers have a secure connection with their students. They adjust the planned curriculum according to students’ needs. Take a look at this TEDx video on what makes a teacher great^

      Admittedly, this is not a complete list of professional educator features. Think, what else you can add to your teaching profession essay. By the way, you can take a closer look at this student’s “Why I Want to Be a Teacher” essay sample:

      🦉 Changing the World

      How many times have you heard that teachers change the world? It might sound quite trivial, but they do. Educators have a significant impact on the new generation’s development and their effect on society. Their influence expands to every sphere of our life, from business to community, from ecology to economics.

      How teachers change the world.

      Here are the four secrets of how teachers change the world:

      Sharing. A good educator shares their knowledge with others: students and colleagues. They bring their ideas and concepts to conferences, write blogs, and hold school meetings. Everyone benefits from this sharing. An educator gets feedback while their audience learns something new and motivating.
      Yes, it takes a lot of effort to set aside time for this, especially when you have a tight schedule. But it’s worth it. Think, would learning theories have ever existed if teachers didn’t share them?

      Caring. Educators not only care for their students, but in most cases, they actively participate in charity. Think about what impact it can have when students, parents, and teachers work together for something significant. It can be anything: from planting trees to fundraising for cancer.
      Such activities help students to gain valuable experience in helping others and saving our planet. In most cases, they will continue doing so even after graduation.

      Networking. In daily lives, teachers overcome various challenges. The networking and learning from other’s experiences allow the educator to see alternative points of view, motivate others, and find out new approaches to teaching.

      Reflection. Educators regularly analyze what works and what not at their lessons. Regular observations help them adjust the curriculum or change teaching methods. A critical approach to their work allows the educator to optimize and make their job more impactful.

      Now you have all the arguments to consider in your essay about the teacher’s profession.

      🛑 7 Reasons Not to Become a Teacher

      Teaching is not easy and not a profession you should choose unless ready to face all its challenges. And here’s the “shortlist” of them:

      Low salary. Yes. Educators from all over the world don’t get paid enough. On average, teachers’ weekly wages are 19.6% lower than those of other professions. So if you are not ready to live, hardly able to make ends meet, being a school educator is not your number one career choice.

      Teachers spend their salaries on students and school staff. Most teachers spend a part of their earnings on purchasing school tools and gear. In 2012-2013, K-12 educators spent 1.6 billion dollars on classroom supplies. That’s not fair. Are you ready to waste your hard-earned money this way? Moreover, you will have to transport all this stuff to class on your own.

      Teachers have to deal with all disturbing trends. Des-pa-si-to. Does this song make you roll up your eyes? And what about the whole class with fidget spinners? How about that these things repeat day by day for a couple of months? Think if you can deal with your irritation and anger. If negative, consider another profession.

      Teachers don’t have weekends and vacations. You may be wondering why. And here’s the answer: they write lesson plans, check countless essays and projects, etc. Yes, in most cases, you won’t have time for yourself and your hobby. And… even for your family.

      Educators are at high risk of public embarrassment. This means you will have to control everything you post on social media, your behavior, and every word you say to anyone. It’s like living under the microscope. And it’s exhausting.

      Students always try to escape studying, and some parents blame teachers for that. Have you ever missed an essay submission deadline because of procrastination? Even if the answer is “No,” your students will. And some of their parents will blame you. They can say that you did not adequately explain the lesson material, or you’re too prejudiced to their kids, or… whatever it would be, you’ll be wrong.

      Students can be abusive. Even the best teacher faced abuse and bullying in class. Think, will you be able to deal with troubled youth and bad behavior day by day?

      As you can see, teaching is a stressful, low-paying, and thankless job. There are many reasons not to become a teacher you can use in your paper and to think about when choosing a career. However, many people still decide to be teachers because it is much more than just a profession. They want this career path as the passion of their lives.

      📜 Teacher Topic: Paper Types

      You may say that it’s just a teacher topic essay, what are we talking about? There are plenty of other types of essays on teaching that your professor may also ask to write. Check our blog to learn more about their specifics.

      Below, we will give you all the essentials on being a teacher paper:

      🗺️ Application Essay

      You will have to write this type of essay when applying for a job. This paper is a crucial part of your application. You have to prove to your future employer that you meet all the requirements of your future career.

      At first sight, it’s similar to a CV or a cover letter. But the job application essay is an entirely different paper. And here are some of the features of these papers:

      Life experience and hobbies. In your CV or resume, you state your hobbies, interests, and even the places you have visited. However, in the teacher application, you provide only relevant information about yourself that clearly shows that your experience makes you the best candidate for this position.

      Personalization. You may not change your CV when applying to various companies (unless you want to tailor it to a particular employer and position). But your teacher application essay must be customized. Some employers will ask you to tell more about yourself while others require you to solve a specific issue in the application.

      Your ambitions and enthusiasm. The CV doesn’t show your objectives or attitude to various teaching theories. Otherwise, your employer can ask you to write an essay that represents your professional goals.

      🔔 Personal Statement

      The personal statement is quite similar to the job application letter. You will write it when applying to a college, university, or for a job. The difference between personal statement and a job application essay is that the first one leaves more space for your creativity.

      As in the teacher application essay, you will have to customize it according to the job requirements and express both your ambitions and personal features.

      Some employers require you to submit a personal statement along with the CV and cover letter.

      💭 Autobiography

      You may be wondering why you may need to write an autobiography of a teacher. This essay will be useful for your future portfolio. For example, you can add it to a job search portfolio or “about me” section on social media.

      Needless to say that social networking nowadays is an essential part of a job search or career change. So, make sure that your autobiography of becoming a teacher contains only positive details.

      However, you have to remember that an autobiography on Facebook or LinkedIn (or wherever you decide to place it) should make your profile searchable.

      ✍️ “Why I Want to Be a Teacher” Essay

      Above, we’ve provided the pros and cons of being a teacher. We hope, by now, you have the answer to the “why I want to be a teacher” question.

      So, another issue arises: how to write an essay? Below we will show you all the essentials on writing teacher topic essays with examples.

      1. ✔️ Preparation

      Proper preparation is key to an A+ paper. First, you should determine the topic and arguments you will use in your essay on teacher jobs.

      The arguments depend on the paper type you have to write. For example, you should prepare merits and demerits, or choose points to use in the argumentative essay. Maybe, you should research for a literature review. Whatever it takes, don’t skip this stage!

      2. ✔️ Outline

      The next step is to outline your future paper. An outline is a mandatory part of any essay writing. It’s a plan that will let you structure your ideas and stick to the required word count.

      Here’s an example of “Why I Want to Be a Teacher” college essay outline:

      “Why I want to be a teacher” college essay outline.

      In this 300-word “Why I Would Like to Be a Teacher of Political Science” essay, our experts organized the paper structure and put key ideas to explore in the paper. As you can see, after the introduction, they put the topic aspects to cover and left a part for sources analysis.

      Make a list of your arguments and ensure that they are logically connected. Your professor can require you to write an outline with headings and subheadings as complete sentences or a series of words (phrases). So make sure you’ve carefully read the paper guidelines and understood them.

      3. ✔️ Thesis Statement

      After you’ve finished your outline, you can start essay writing. At this stage, you need to develop a good thesis statement.

      The purpose of your thesis is to explain your position—the central idea of the essay. Tell your reader what you will write in the paper and explain the significance of the subject.

      The thesis statement is usually 1-2 sentences long and concludes the introduction paragraph. You can sketch out your thesis and add some touches after the paper is completed to make sure it meets the essay content.

      4. ✔️ Introduction

      Next, start with an introduction. Here you will have to briefly show the understanding of the teaching profession and its peculiarities:

      A teacher essay introduction opens your paper with a hook. This first sentence aims to grab your reader’s attention. You can start it with a quote or an interesting fact.

      Here’s how your introduction can look like:

      Teacher essay introduction sample.

      5. ✔️ Body Paragraphs

      Now, it’s time to recall all the arguments and evidence you put in your outline. You will write them in your essay body paragraphs. Depending on the required word count and the number of evidence, the paper body typically contains at least three body paragraphs.

      However, some papers can have two body paragraphs. You should know that each idea and point of view must be stated in a separate part. If you have three or five arguments, you have to write three or five paragraphs in your essay, respectively.

      Here’s our sample:

      Teacher essay body sample.

      6. ✔️ Conclusion

      And the last but not the least part of your essay is the conclusion. Here you have to summarize all the ideas presented in the body section and explain how they meet your thesis statement.

      Don’t try to repeat the thesis word by word or provide any new ideas. Here’s an example of a conclusion for an “I Want to Become a Teacher” essay:

      Teacher essay conclusion sample.

      If you used any sources, don’t forget to include the reference list in your paper according to the required citation style.

      📑 “Why I Want To Be A Teacher” Personal Statement

      The purpose of the personal statement is to tell the admissions officer or recruiter why you decided to become a teacher. You can be required to submit one along with your college, university, scholarship, or job application.

      A teacher’s personal statement is a document where you can express your personality. Want to learn all the dos and don’ts of its writing?

      Just keep reading!

      📝 Personal Statement: Tips

      A typical personal statement is up to 700 words or 4,000 characters long, including intro, body, and conclusion. To keep word count tracking, you can type it in Word or Google Documents. Now, let’s consider critical points of personal statement writing that you can use for college/uni and job application:

      Intro. Your introductory paragraph is an excellent opportunity to open the statement with memorable sentences about why you chose to become a teacher. Make it bright and clear.

      Structure. As we mentioned above, each of your points should have supporting evidence. For example, if you’re writing about your experience, explain what you have learned and how this will help you in your future career.

      Conclusion. The secret of good personal statement endings is to keep it simple and clear. Explain why you would be a perfect asset to this company or college and make a statement on why they would be lucky to have you as an employee or a student.

      Personal statement for primary teaching. In case you’re going to apply for a teaching role or major, you should mention skills that will be useful for extracurricular school activities. You need to prove that you will be able to help with school plays or organize various off-class events.

      Postgraduate personal statement. Here, you have to show your abilities and academic interests. Persuade the admission officers how you will benefit from studying the program and your impact on science.

      The next point to consider is what to write in the body section of your “Why Do You Want to Be a Teacher” personal statement. Here are some questions to answer in your paper:

      🙅‍♀️ Personal Statement: Common mistakes

      A personal statement may be the only way to make a first impression on your recruiter or admissions officer. There might be no other opportunity. That’s why you must know the most common mistakes to avoid:

      Negative tone. Believe us: no one wants to read the pessimistic, weak, or adverse essay. Even if you have to describe an uncomfortable fact, try to make it positive.

      Using online templates. If you found a great personal statement template that you think will perfectly fit your paper, stop! Recruiters and college admissions have seen dozens and dozens of them, so there are high chances that your application will be declined. Spend a little more time and write a statement yourself.

      Including irrelevant facts or lies. Recruiters spend, on average, six seconds on reading the CV and a personal statement. That’s why you should neither tell a cool story about your grandmother’s birthday nor tell lies. In the first case, it’s annoying. Moreover, it may lead to firing or dismissal from the college.

      Using clichés, jargon, overused words, etc. A personal statement requires a formal tone, so conversational tone is merely unacceptable.

      Using the same personal statement for different applications. Even if you send your application to ten different companies or colleges, personalize it! Include some facts from the firm’s or university’s history, mission, or vision, and explain how your skills meet them.

      Leaving writing the statement to the last minute. It takes some time to prepare, draft, and polish your paper to make it stand out from other applications.

      If you still need a “Why Do You Want to Be a Teacher?” personal statement example, check the sample below:

      🖨️ 10 Teacher Essay Topics

      In case you want something more than “why did you decide to become a teacher,” check the topics below. We believe that your teacher will appreciate reading your paper.

      A recess for primary school students. Imagine if you were a school principal. Would you sacrifice the break in favor of additional study time? Explain your point of view.

      Homework: yay or nay? Think, how much time should students spend on their homework at the elementary school? Should there be homework projects at all? Provide your points and evidence and show how they are connected to your teaching philosophy.

      Technologies in education: pros and cons. Examine the advantages and disadvantages of using desktops and tablets at school and for homework.
      Handwriting at elementary school. Some schools stopped teaching students cursive writing. Provide your point of view on whether handwriting is a lost art or an unnecessary vestige.

      Standardized tests in school. Do these tests seem discriminatory? Should they be tied to funding? Elaborate on whether they cause too much anxiety for students.

      Second language learning: advantages and disadvantages. How many languages should an average school graduate know? Do pupils need to learn any second language at school?

      Armed security in educational institutions. More and more school mass shootings are reported. Armed guards might protect students. Do your research on gun control and demonstrate your opinion.

      Early start times at school. Explore how such start times impact on students’ perception of the lesson material.

      Inclusive education for students with disabilities. Research about techniques that will best fit your students with special needs. Show the connection between them and your teaching approach.

      Want more tips and advice on resume writing? Check this article on how to make a resume written by our experts!

      Good luck with your essay about being a teacher! Share the article with those who may need it.

      Why Do We Write? 4 Key Reasons Why Telling and Sharing Stories Matters

      Why do we write? Nonfiction and fiction writing has been an instrumental way for people to connect to one another in the real world.

      why do we write?

      Stories are about change, and by reading and watching them we, ourselves, can change for the better.

      But do people write for different reasons, and are some of those reasons more meaningful than others?

      Are you sitting at your computer right now, possibly plunging through your first draft (or much later draft), and debating whether or not a writing career is the one for you?

      Do you wonder if the written word is how you’ll make your mark on the world—and if it is, is a writing career what you want in life?

      Why Telling and Sharing Stories Matters

      It’s safe to say there are more writers now than at any other time in history.

      At the beginning of my writing career, I went to the AWP conference in Chicago, eager to learn and excited to start making connections with other writers. There were 10,000 other writers there. That was one conference years back.

      Back when I first wrote this post, in 2012, the amount of creative writing programs at universities had exploded from about 50 in the 1980s to over 300 just in the US. There were over 110 million bloggers running their own blogs.

      In 2021, I’m sure the numbers shave only increased.

      That’s a lot of competition.

      Seriously though, why do we write? Why are all of us pursuing writing in the face of the increasingly limited attention spans of the broader public?

      It’s not like we’re making much money at it, if any.

      What motivates us to keep going? How does writing make a positive difference in our own life, and in the lives of those around us?

      4 Reasons Why We Write

      Whether or not we’re writing short stories for a high school assignment, finishing novels that we self-publish on Amazon, or writing full-time with the success of notable authors like Stephen King (wouldn’t that be amazing?), we write for many reasons.

      However, there are four main reasons for why I write. I wonder if these will resonate with you:

      1. To Be Alive

      We write to be fully alive.

      Sir Ken Robinson says:

      The arts especially address the idea of aesthetic experience. An aesthetic experience is one in which your senses are operating at their peak; when you’re present in the current moment; when you’re resonating with the excitement of this thing that you’re experiencing; when you are fully alive.

      The act of writing draws us into the moment. We see the blades of grass, hear the sharp chirp of the morning cricket, watch the shade travel from one edge of the yard to the other, seemingly for the first time.

      Writing helps us make art out of everyday, ordinary moments.

      With each piece of writing, we’re invited to see the world from a fresh perspective.

      We seize an opportunity to ground ourselves in a point of view that can be our own—or that of a new character. One who waits eagerly to teach us something special about ourselves and our potentials.

      Writing gives us a surplus of moments to really sympathize with a person, explore a world, and learn from a story in a way that reminds us what really matters in life.

      We engender a growth mindset through writing—and writing deeply.

      A writing life is rich with truth and adventures that bring our very beings to life.

      2. To Make a Name for Ourselves

      George Orwell says one motivation to write is sheer egoism, that we write out of the “desire to seem clever, to be talked about, to be remembered after death, to get your own back on the grown-ups who snubbed you in childhood, etc., etc.”

      That’s part of it, but I think the motivation goes much deeper than being well-liked in the present moment.

      If you’re being honest, you would agree that it would be nice to live forever. But if you can’t live forever physically, then why can’t your memory live forever?

      We’re still talking about Chaucer, Virginia Woolf, Mark Twain, and George Elliott long after their deaths. Why not you?

      While this might not be the most unselfish of motivations, it’s certainly natural. Writers who share their stories build a legacy that will also beyond their lifetimes.

      Writing lets us make a mark on the present world and future generations—if writers have the courage to print their stories on paper, and then pass it on to a reader.

      And, with some luck, that readers passes that story on to another reader, who passes it on again.

      3. To Change the World

      People consume now more than ever in the history of the world.

      We eat more, we listen to more music, and we consume more information. However, we’ve also learned enough about consumerism to know it won’t make us happy.

      Writing gives us a chance to turn the tides on consumerism. Rather than consume more, we can make something.

      Instead of fueling destruction, we empower creation. Isn’t that exciting?

      Every day, when you put your fingers to the keys, you’re creating something. And then, with the click of button, you can share it with the world.

      Humans have a built in need to make our mark on the world. We want to bring new things to life, to mold things into the image we have in our imaginations, to subdue the earth.

      We write not just to change the world, but to create a new world.

      And with each new world, new possibilities.

      New stories, which not only complete the circle of life but enrich it.

      4. To Discover Meaning

      The psychiatrist Victor Frankl posited that the main search of mankind is not happiness or pleasure but meaning. “Life is never made unbearable by circumstances, but only by lack of meaning and purpose,” he wrote in Man’s Search for Meaning.

      Writers are uniquely gifted to find meaning for themselves and to help others find meaning.

      In fact, this has always been the main task of storytellers. Every story matters to the person living it, and our job is to tell the universal stories, the stories that reveal the story of every person on the earth.

      We write to bring meaning to the world.

      That goal isn’t synonymous with writing a best seller on the New York Times list—although, wouldn’t that be nice?

      You never know whose life your story could change.

      That’s why, deep down, we, as writers, understand that it’s important to not only start but finish what we write.

      We All Have Stories to Tell

      Regardless of how many copies of a book you sell, stories share meaning and messages with patterns, and those patterns are absorbed and retained by people reaching out to the world for answers.

      Each of our lives is a precious story in itself. And each of of us has an unlimited amount of stories to tell.

      I hope that you will write your stories down for us.

      What do you think? Why do you write, and why are there so many people writing today? Let us know in the comments.

      PRACTICE

      Today, spend some time free writing.

      As you write, contemplate your motivations. Are they pure enough to keep you going despite everything?

      Write for fifteen minutes. When you’re finished, post your practice in the comments section. And if you post be sure to comment on a few posts by other writers.

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